Explained: Why does cricket have a bad light problem? – The Indian Express

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Explained: Why does cricket have a bad light problem? – The Indian Express

Written by Sandip G | New Delhi | Updated: August 19, 2020 3:39:57 pm

bad light cricket, bad light interruptions cricket, bad light england pakistan, cricket light conditions, cricket newsClouds loom over the Ageas Bowl during the fourth day of the second cricket Test match between England and Pakistan, in Southampton, England, Sunday, August 16, 2020. (Glyn Kirk/Pool via AP)

The second Test between England and Pakistan saw sustained spells of shower and constant bad light, despite the shimmering floodlights, reduced the match to just 134.3 overs send down across five days. Rain breaks are unpreventable, unless grounds are roofed. But interruptions due to bad light are preventable, more so for a technologically evolved game. Hence, there is a growing chorus for a reassessment of the existing rules.

What are the current laws pertaining to bad light?

Since 2010, bad light has come under the absolute discretion of the umpire. If they feel the light is deteriorating, they will use a light-meter to measure the light. Depending on the readings, they will stop or let the game continue. The reference point — always is their first reading. Suppose on Day One if they had called off the play after a particular reading on the light-meter, they should stick to the same reading throughout the Test. That is even if players are happy with the light, the umpires have no other option
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